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Bradford's Hip Flexor Injury

Allen Bradford reportedly has a hip Flexor injury. From Wolf's blog. This is more common than you think as runners get this fairly frequently.

From the American Academy of Family Physicians:


The Hip Musculature
Photo:The AAFP
Strains and Tendonitis

A strain is an acute injury to a muscle or tendon. In contrast, "tendonitis" is the term for acute inflammatory tendon changes secondary to overuse. In the anterior hip, the muscles most likely to be acutely or chronically injured are the rectus abdominis, iliopsoas, adductor longus and rectus femoris. Most often, the injuries occur at the muscle-tendon junction.

Acute injuries secondary to violent muscle contraction or stretch generally present abruptly with pain that increases with continued activity, swelling and ecchymosis. Chronic injuries (tendonitis) often present insidiously with increasing activity intolerance in a setting of relative overuse. The physical examination may reveal swelling or ecchymosis, along with local tenderness or crepitus (tendonitis) when more superficial structures are involved. Findings also include pain and loss of flexibility during passive stretch, and pain and weakness during muscle contraction against resistance.

In patients with iliopsoas tendonitis, which is also known as "internal snapping hip," a "snap" or deep "clunk" may be heard over the tendon at the hip flexor crease as the hip moves from flexion to extension. The clunk is secondary to snapping of the iliopsoas tendon medially to laterally across the femoral head or, less frequently, the iliopectineal eminence. Inflammation of the iliopsoas bursae may play a role in tendonitis.

Tendonitis requires similar conservative treatment, although the initial period of disability is generally not as great. Rehabilitation should also include scrutiny of the training program that led to the problem, correcting poor technique that may be causing tissue overload and addressing regional biomechanical dysfunction.

This will keep him out for the rest of spring practice and is easily treated with rest and reduced activity.